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Four Red Flags for Plumbing Problems When Buying a Home

Prospective home buyers have a lot of factors to consider before making the final decision to purchase a house. Ideally, the building offers move-in condition, allowing the new owner to take up residence a soon as possible. One important step to take before purchasing a home is to check the plumbing system to make sure that everything is in order. Four situations provide red flags that something is amiss and a professional inspection is needed.

Faulty Water Flow
If you turn on one of the faucets and the water flow is minimal, it is an indication that the plumbing system needs maintenance or repair. If the problem exists in more than one area of the home, it might be a serious issue that you should avoid by looking at different properties and giving up on the one that you are looking at currently.

Faulty Black Water Lines
One of the best ways to evaluate the plumbing system’s ability to remove black/grey water is to flush the toilet. Observe how easily the water goes down and take note of any seepage around the base of the toilet. You should also fill up one of the sinks and watch it drain. Be sure to walk around the perimeter of the basement as well as the outside of the home in search of wet spots.

No Hot Water
If you turn on the faucet that is supposed to deliver hot water and you don’t get any, it’s time to check all of the sinks, showers, and bathtubs in the house. If you can’t get any hot water at any of these locations, it is possible that the hot water heater is broken. You should request that repairs or replacement be handled and are made a contingency of any offer that you provide.

Leaks
Minor leaks can usually be repaired with the simple replacement of a washer. However, multiple leaks are indicative of a more serious issue, particularly if they create puddles or wet spots on the walls, floors, or ceilings.

If you are buying a home, it is important to check out the plumbing system to see if it is in good working order. Whether you try out the faucets and flush the toilet on your own or you bring in a professional plumber for a thorough inspection, an evaluation of the plumbing equipment should be a part of your decision-making process. If you aren’t in love with the property, continuing your search might be the wiser choice to make.

 

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How to Avoid and Thaw Frozen Pipes

As the fall months of October and November turn over into the frosty winter months of December and January here in North Carolina, the Raleigh professional plumbers at Poole’s Plumbing want to remind you that there is still a chance of winter plumbing hazards and in the easy to follow steps listed below, you can be certain to avoid a costly catastrophe as you Avoid and Thaw Frozen Pipes.

Case in point that we are not yet completely “out of the water,” when it comes to needing to know the proper steps to take to Avoid and Thaw Frozen Pipes is the recent colder weather we have seen in the past two weeks that has dipped at night below 40 degrees and even into the lower 30’s. Your pipes can freeze once the temperature does drop to 32 degrees Fahrenheit and those most vulnerable to the possibility of freezing would be any located in a basement area, a crawl space, an unconditioned or unfinished attic, those located on an exterior wall, and even pipes located underground.

Frozen Water in the Downspout

When looking at it in those terms, pretty much any homeowner would have some type of piping in one of those location, thus, the Raleigh plumbing experts at Poole’s Plumbing can assist you with a few key pointers to Avoid and Thaw Frozen Pipes at each location you may have them. If you happen to turn on a faucet and no water pours out, it could be due to a blockage caused by ice and in each given location, these following “do-it-yourself” tips could prove priceless in avoiding disaster.

Exposed Pipes

  • Remember to open up the faucet to relieve pressure
  • When suspecting a possible frozen pipe, always shut off the main water supply in case it has burst
  • Usage of a hair dryer, electric heating pad, or space heater can help in thawing, but NEVER use an open flame to try and thaw an exposed pipe

Pipes Behind a Wall

  • The easiest and safest method with these pipes is to turn your thermostat up and wait for them to thaw.
  • In situations that need to be addressed immediately, carefully cut a whole in the wall and utilize any of the above methods listed for thawing an exposed pipe

Avoiding Frozen Pipes in the Future

  • Before the winter months arrive, be sure that all garden hoses are disconnected from any spigots
  • Keep a faucet that may be connected to a line that would be in danger of freezing open to allow just a small trickle of cold water to run over night
  • Keep cabinets that it below your sinks open to allow the warm air from your home to circulate around them
  • Insulate any exposed, external wall pipes
  • Never leave your thermostat below 55 degrees in any situation, even if going out of town or on vacation for an extended period of time.

 By following these easy to do, at home tips from the pros at Poole’s Plumbing, you can not only Avoid and Thaw Frozen Pipes, but you also can avoid serious water and financial damage with very little preparation or effort.