Tankless Vs. Tank Water Heaters: Which One to Choose?

Tankless Vs. Tank Water Heaters: Which One to Choose? — Choosing a water heater for your home might seem like an easy task, but with a plethora of options available in the market, it can quickly become overwhelming. While the most common types are tank and tankless water heaters, you might be wondering which one is better. In this blog post, we’ll explain the differences between the two and list the pros and cons of each to help you make an informed decision.

Tank Water Heaters

Tank Water Heaters

Tank water heaters store hot water in a tank, which is heated by gas or electric power. The heater kicks in when the temperature drops below the set level, and then it warms the water back up to the desired temperature. Tank water heaters are cheaper than tankless heaters, and many people are more familiar with them.

Pros of a Tank Water Heater:

  • Purchase and installation cost is lower than that of a tankless heater
  • Can handle multiple outlets running at the same time
  • Installation is simpler than a tankless heater
  • Larger tanks are available to provide a bigger capacity of hot water storage.

Cons of a Tank Water Heater:

  • Water in the tank can lose heat and therefore waste electricity or gas
  • Lifespan is generally shorter than tankless heaters
  • Tanks require space to store which may not be ideal for homes with limited space or living in communal buildings.
Tankless Water Heaters

Tankless Water Heaters

A tankless water heater does not store hot water. Instead, when you turn on a hot water faucet, water is heated with a gas burner or electric element as it passes through the current of pipes. This means you only get hot water on-demand, and nothing is wasted by being stored away in a tank.

Pros of a Tankless Water Heater:

  • Energy-efficient since no energy is being wasted in storing water
  • Takes up less space than a tank water heater
  • Higher lifespan than a tank water heater
  • On-demand hot water that is always available

Cons of a Tankless Water Heater:

  • Installation and purchase cost is higher than that of a tank heater
  • Cannot handle several water outlets operating simultaneously
  • In cold areas, they might require larger units with higher heating capabilities to cope with the high demand to ensure adequate supply of hot water
  • Can be a bit complex to install and may require a professional plumber

Conclusion:

Both Tank and Tankless water heaters have advantages and disadvantages. When deciding which type of water heater you want to purchase, or upgrade too, you will need to consider factors such as your living situation, location, family size, and energy-use habits. If you have a large family and limited hot water needs, a tank water heater can be a great option. On the other hand, if you’re environmentally-conscious, a tankless water heater could be the best choice. Your budget and installation costs, as well as the long-term cost savings, should also inform your decision. With this information, you can choose which option is most suitable for your home.

When considering switching from a tank to a tankless water heater, it’s crucial to consult a professional plumber. This is because there are specific permits and regulations that need to be followed when installing a new water heater, vs just replacing an existing one. A plumber can also help determine the right size and type of tankless water heater for your household’s needs, as well as advise on any potential installation issues that may arise.

Contact one of Poole’s Plumbing’s certified and insured, expert water heater installers to learn more about worry-free plumbing and making the switch to a tankless water heater. With their expertise, you can have peace of mind knowing your new water heater is installed correctly and efficiently. In conclusion, both options have their own set of advantages and disadvantages, so it ultimately comes down to personal preference.

Water Heater

Tankless Water Heaters in Older Homes

Tankless Water Heaters in Older Homes — Excellent Tankless water heaters, also known as on-demand water heaters, can be an energy-efficient upgrade for a home. However, installing a tankless water heater in an older home can present some unique challenges. Older homes may have smaller diameter water supply lines that cannot accommodate the higher flow rates of tankless heaters. They may also have electrical systems that cannot handle the power needs of the heater. However, with some planning and problem-solving, installing a tankless water heater in an older home is often possible.

Installing a tankless water heater in an older home can be tricky. However, not only do you need to make sure that the existing plumbing and electrical systems are up to code, but you also have to consider the age of the house itself. Older homes typically have smaller diameter water supply lines, which may need help to handle the higher flow rates of modern tankless heaters. In addition, electric tankless heaters require more power than most older electrical systems can provide. However, with proper planning and problem-solving, installing a new modern tankless water heater in an older home is still possible.

You can upgrade to an efficient tankless water heater even in an older home with some adjustments and the right tankless model choice. Doing your homework upfront will help ensure you choose the best option for your home’s needs and can address any challenges during installation. Installing a new modern tankless water heater in an older home can significantly upgrade energy efficiency and save money on utility bills. However, it’s essential to consider the age of the house and its existing plumbing and electrical systems before making any decisions. Older homes typically have smaller diameter water supply lines, which may need help to handle the higher flow rates of modern tankless heaters. In addition, electric tankless heaters require more power than most older electrical systems can provide. However, with some adjustments and careful planning, you can still install a new modern tankless water heater in an older home.

Tankless Water Heaters in Older Homes

Here are some steps to take when working with Tankless Water Heaters in older homes:

  1. Check the size of your home’s water supply lines and electrical system. Tankless water heaters typically require a minimum of 3/4-inch water supply lines and a 200-amp electrical service. If your lines or service panel do not meet these requirements, you must upgrade before installing the tankless heater.
  2. Consider a lower flow model. If upgrading your plumbing or electrical system is not feasible, choose a tankless model with a lower flow rate requirement. These typically produce hot water more slowly but can function with smaller supply lines and less power.
  3. Install a circulation pump. If you have long plumbing runs with many fixtures, a circulation pump can help ensure hot water is delivered quickly to all outlets. The pump keeps water moving, so it produces hot water.
  4. Add insulation and heat traps. Insulating your water supply lines and installing heat traps or hot water recirculation valves on fixtures can also help improve the performance of a tankless water heater in an older home. Reducing heat loss means the water heater does not have to work as hard to keep water hot.

Considering these steps when upgrading to a modern tankless water heater in an older home, you’ll surely increase energy efficiency while saving money on utility bills.
For additional questions regarding tankless water heaters, contact us at www.poolesplumbing.com

Choosing the right water heater for your home

Choosing the right water heater for your home

Choosing the right water heater for your home. Water heaters are one of the essential appliances in your home. They provide hot water for showers, washing dishes and clothes, and can even heat your home. However, with so many options, types, and sizes of water heaters, it can be challenging to know which one is right for you.

There’s more to owning a water heater than just heating water. Whether you’re thinking about buying a new one or already have one in your home, it’s essential to know the ins and outs of these appliances.

What you need to know about water heaters:

Choosing the right water heater for your home

How they work: Water heaters use electricity or gas to heat and store it in a tank. The tank size will determine how much hot water you have on hand at any given time.

What they cost: Water heaters can range from around $300 to $1,500. The price will depend on the unit’s type and size, the fuel it uses, and any special features it has.

How to choose the right one: When choosing a water heater, you’ll need to decide on the size, fuel type, and any special features you want. You’ll also need to consider your climate and how much hot water you typically use.

How to maintain them: Water heaters should be flushed out every six months to remove sediment build-up. This will help extend the unit’s life and ensure it works properly. You’ll also need to occasionally check the anode rod and replace it, if necessary.

-If your water heater’s pilot light has gone out, you’ll need to relight it. Here are a few steps to take to get your pilot light burning again:

First, locate the pilot light assembly on your water heater. This is usually located near the bottom of the unit. Once you’ve found it, turn off the gas supply to the team. Then, use a flashlight to inspect the area around the pilot light for debris or blockages.

Next, use a small wire brush to clean off the tip of the pilot light assembly. Once that’s done, turn on the gas and use a long lighter to ignite the pilot light. Hold the flame close to the opening for at least 30 seconds before releasing it.

If the pilot light doesn’t stay lit, you may need to adjust the flame. To do this, turn the knob that controls the gas flow to the “low” setting and relight the pilot light. Once it’s lit, slowly turn the knob back to the “high” setting.

Here is a guide to the different types of water heaters and what you need to know before you buy one.

1. Storage Water Heaters

The storage water heater is the most common type of water heater. This type of water heater will store hot water in a tank and then uses a heating element to keep the water hot. Storage water heaters come in various sizes, so they can be used in homes of all sizes.

2. Tankless Water Heaters

Another type of water heater is the tankless water heater. This type of water heater does not store hot water in a tank. Instead, it heats water on demand, so you only use energy when you need hot water. Tankless water heaters are becoming increasingly popular because they are more efficient than storage water heaters.

3. Solar Water Heaters

Solar water heaters are sustainable by using the sun’s energy to heat water. They are a more environmentally friendly option than other types of water heaters and can save you money on your energy bills. However, solar water heaters require a sunny location and can be expensive to install.

4. Heat Pump Water Heaters

Heat pump water heaters will use electricity to move heat from one place to another. This type of water heater is more efficient than other water heaters and can save you money on energy bills. However, heat pump water heaters require a well-insulated space and can be expensive to install.

Understanding water heaters allow you to choose the right one for your home and budget. And by taking good care of it, you can enjoy many years of hot water.

For more information, contact Raleigh’s most trusted plumber at www.poolesplumbing.com.